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How To Password Protect USB Drive Using 3 Simple Ways

How To Password Protect USB Drive: 3 Easy Ways

We are now in the age when everything around us gets smaller, more compact, portable and easily transferrable. At the forefront is a USB (Universal Serial Bus) thumb drive. It is a small and portable storage device which is compatible with almost every technological device or gadget known to man. As its name implies, it’s universal and can be used with practically any device with USB ports. With these features, it’s easily the top choice for many. It comes in variety of shapes and sizes. Due to its compact size, one can easily lose or misplace it. It’s very risky especially if it contains sensitive and confidential data.

That’s where a call for data protection and security come to play. Needless to say, it’s imperative to protect your data and its storage. Commonly, putting a password to your USB drive is the way to go. But it’s not as easy as it sounds. It’s not like creating a password for your Facebook Account.

Password protecting or encrypting your USB drives entails the use of various tools, unless you want to go an easier route and shell out a few dollars then buy a secure flash drive with hardware encryption.

How To Password Protect USB Drive?

As discussed earlier, the surest way to protect your data is through encryption. But it costs a few extra dollars, so an alternate is to put a password on your files instead. Especially, if you don’t intend to password protect the entire USB drive, you may also want to sort your files from sensitive which need protection and those that are not.

Manually Save Files With a Password

As mentioned above, you can’t safely password protect your entire USB stick without using encryption. However, if you shy away from the time consuming encryption process of entire folders and need a really quick way to only protect a few selected files, maybe you can simply save those with a USB password.

Windows programs like MS Word and Excel provide an option to save your work with a password.

In MS Word, you need to go Tools > Options and Security tab. It will let you key in your preferred Password which will be used to open such file. See image below.

Many programs, including Word and Excel, allow you to save files with a password. For example in Word, while the document is open, go to > Tools > Options and switch to the Security tab. Now enter a Password to open, click OK, re-enter the password when asked, and finally save your document and don’t forget the password.

Create An Encrypted & Password Protected Partition With Rohos Mini Drive:

Various encryption tools abound. However, most of them require Administrator rights to install and use them. An example of this is TrueCrypt, this may not appeal to users who do not have administrator rights. Rohos Mini Drive, on the other hand, does away with requiring users to have Administrator rights. Its free version can be used to create a hidden and password protected partition of up to 2GB in your USB drive. It utilizes automatic on-the-fly encryption with AES 256 bit key length. It’s easy to use feature lets users encrypt their USB drives and use it to any device.

Rohos Mini Drive, You can access it via Rohos Mini.exe icon from the root folder. You just have to key in your password and instantly Rohos disk will be mounted and accessible via your Computer. To disconnect your encrypted USB drive, just right-click the Rohos icon from the Windows taskbar notification area and select Disconnect.

Lock Your Flash Drive with USB Safeguard:

Aside from Rohos Mini Drive, there’s another popular USB encryption for Password Protect USB Drive, choice which is called USB Safeguard. It is described as your friendly portable app that runs directly from your flash drive which doesn’t require Administrator rights to use. It utilizes on-the-fly AES 256 bit encryption. However, its storage capacity is limited only to 2GB for free version.

Get it by downloading the app usbsafeguard.exe and save it to your USB flash drive. You will be prompted for a password when running it the first time. That password will be used when accessing your USB drive so, better keep that in mind. It’s simple and very self-explanatory, unlock it when in use and then lock it when done with it. Refer to the image below.

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